Bright Eyes and High Hopes

Musings, Music, Dance, Quotes, Science

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

becomming:

xlizardx:

Apparently this is "The clearest photo of Mercury ever taken."

why isnt everyone getting so excited about this, it is literally another planet look at how beautiful it is stop what your doing and look at how alien like this planet is what is living there oh my god mercury

(via stashberry)

“We can’t be tremendous all the time, sometimes we’re only magnificent”

—   Etho (via fyeahmindcrack)

(Source: infinitummc, via fyeahmindcrack)

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea saltGreen = organicsRed = dustWhite = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea salt
Green = organics
Red = dust
White = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

we-are-star-stuff:

If you really want a headache (the good kind), take a long look at this “photo”. No, this is not a photo of the cosmic microwave background radiation (which you can actually see for yourself if you change your television channel to one of the “fuzzy” stations) nor is it a collection of graphs of a cell structure. So, instead of telling you what it isn’t, how about I tell you what it is? This is, well… everything. Everything we can see and observe anyway. What you’re looking at is the “observable” universe. This particular map has a cellular appearance due to how the galaxies tend to collect into vast sheets and super clusters of stars that are surrounded by stunningly large voids in between them. You and I and everything we’ve ever known are smack in the middle there, along with our Local group, which is a part of the larger Virgo Supercluster.  All of those other dots are also superclusters, each containing perhaps trillions of stars.Since the speed of light is a constant in the vacuum of space, there is an outer edge to what is observable from Earth. That outer edge is defined by the objects within 14 billion years away (how old the universe is estimated to be), which is the time it would take for the light from these distant objects to reach us here on Earth. In this sense, the objects that are the farthest away from us are literally some of the earliest stars and galaxies in the young universe. it’s quite likely that the stars we’re observing are no longer burning and the ones that have formed from the gases expelled during the supernova of the previous stars are in another place entirely.Since the universe has been expanding indefinitely since the big bang, the number of objects seen in the observable universe will shorten with time and it will appear as if the universe is much smaller than it does now - due to the light not having the proper amount of time to travel to the distant reaches of the universe. This expansion that’s going on in all directions is also the reason why our solar system appears to lie in the middle of the universe. In fact, every inhabited planet circling a distant star will look out into the universe and they will see that the universe is expanding away from them, giving the impression that they are located smack in the center of it all.The “observable” universe consists of:
10 million superclusters
25 billion galaxy groups
350 billion large galaxies
7 trillion dwarf galaxies
30 billion trillion (3X10^22) stars (of which almost 30 stars go supernova per second)
According to some math that I have no desire to go into, if you imagine the size of the observable universe (13.7 billion light-years) to be that of one nucleus of an atom and compare that with the size of the unobservable universe, then the total universe is 10 billion times larger than the size of the unobservable universe compared to a nucleus of an atom AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO GET BIGGER.You can look at those numbers here. Keep in mind that it’s impossible for us to know the exact size of the unobservable universe, so the above is an estimation. It could be much larger than that!
[Continue reading →]

we-are-star-stuff:

If you really want a headache (the good kind), take a long look at this “photo”. No, this is not a photo of the cosmic microwave background radiation (which you can actually see for yourself if you change your television channel to one of the “fuzzy” stations) nor is it a collection of graphs of a cell structure. So, instead of telling you what it isn’t, how about I tell you what it is? This is, well… everything. Everything we can see and observe anyway. What you’re looking at is the “observable” universe. This particular map has a cellular appearance due to how the galaxies tend to collect into vast sheets and super clusters of stars that are surrounded by stunningly large voids in between them. You and I and everything we’ve ever known are smack in the middle there, along with our Local group, which is a part of the larger Virgo Supercluster.  All of those other dots are also superclusters, each containing perhaps trillions of stars.

Since the speed of light is a constant in the vacuum of space, there is an outer edge to what is observable from Earth. That outer edge is defined by the objects within 14 billion years away (how old the universe is estimated to be), which is the time it would take for the light from these distant objects to reach us here on Earth. In this sense, the objects that are the farthest away from us are literally some of the earliest stars and galaxies in the young universe. it’s quite likely that the stars we’re observing are no longer burning and the ones that have formed from the gases expelled during the supernova of the previous stars are in another place entirely.

Since the universe has been expanding indefinitely since the big bang, the number of objects seen in the observable universe will shorten with time and it will appear as if the universe is much smaller than it does now - due to the light not having the proper amount of time to travel to the distant reaches of the universe. This expansion that’s going on in all directions is also the reason why our solar system appears to lie in the middle of the universe. In fact, every inhabited planet circling a distant star will look out into the universe and they will see that the universe is expanding away from them, giving the impression that they are located smack in the center of it all.

The “observable” universe consists of:

  • 10 million superclusters
  • 25 billion galaxy groups
  • 350 billion large galaxies
  • 7 trillion dwarf galaxies
  • 30 billion trillion (3X10^22) stars (of which almost 30 stars go supernova per second)

According to some math that I have no desire to go into, if you imagine the size of the observable universe (13.7 billion light-years) to be that of one nucleus of an atom and compare that with the size of the unobservable universe, then the total universe is 10 billion times larger than the size of the unobservable universe compared to a nucleus of an atom AND IT WILL CONTINUE TO GET BIGGER.

You can look at those numbers here

Keep in mind that it’s impossible for us to know the exact size of the unobservable universe, so the above is an estimation. It could be much larger than that!

[Continue reading →]

(via thescienceofreality)

explosm:

By @RobDenBleyker. Go follow them, and then feast your peepers on http://www.explosm.com !

explosm:

By . Go follow them, and then feast your peepers on !

(via rnindcrack)

You’re killing Gavin.

(Source: fueledbydyne, via bethosaurus)


happiness. Ayan Villafuerte, 500px.com

happiness.
Ayan Villafuerte, 500px.com

(Source: djabal, via finnharries)

furuyasatoru:

when u get a cute button up shirt and u think it’s going to fit and it does but. but then. u see it.  The Thing

image

(via stashberry)

karenhart28 asked: Hi Joe! Love your blog, and I wanted to ask: What year is it? Not in the Gregorian calendar but what actual scientific year for the earth is it? And if it's too hard to calculate, do we have an estimate? Thanks!

jtotheizzoe:

Kinda depends on where we set year zero, eh?

My first inclination was to answer this in relation to the Big Bang, calculating today’s date based on the age of the universe. When we average together the results of all the different scientific experiments that have sought to calculate that number, we get 13.798 ± 0.037 billion years, or an uncertainty of 37 million years. That’s less than 0.3% “?” territory, but still pretty fuzzy.

But wait! The idea of a “year” is based on the Earth’s orbit around the sun (and scientists have many ways of defining a year, as it turns out), so you can’t have “years” without Earth. I think Earth’s age is a better starting point. 

Based on radiometric dating of ancient meteorites and other really old rocks, scientists peg Earth’s age at 4.54 ± 0.05 billion years, an uncertainty of 50 million years. Sheesh, 1% error? Are we sure about anything?

That means it’s somewhere between year 4,490,000,000 APF* and 4,590,000,000 APF. Kind of a broad estimate, unfortunately, but it means that next time someone tells you to turn something in or finish a project at work by a certain date, you can just stare at them for a few seconds and say “But we don’t even know what YEAR it is, man…”** and just walk away. 

* “APF” stands for “After Planet Formation” and is an abbreviation I literally just now made up so it should not be deemed scientific, although I AM a scientist, so maybe just say it with conviction and everyone will believe you.

** I recommend using your best Spicoli impression while saying this.

image